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This is the project site for the Cultural History of the Internet course at Johns Hopkins University.

A collective project, it takes a critical approach to internet history, considering a wide spectrum of cultural practices involved in web services and apps, while exploring questions of access and algorithmic bias. It takes an interest in not only the common narratives of innovation, extending from the military infrastructure of ARPANET to the nineties dot-com boom to the emerging internet of things, but also the host of dead ends and lost sites, net ephemera, and once thriving web cultures that risk being forgotten.

The course’s guiding framework is the circuit of culture approach developed by du Gay et al. (1997), which emphasizes the role of meaning in the creation of cultural commodities and outlines five interconnected areas for analyzing any cultural object: “how it is represented, what social identities are associated with it, how it is produced and consumed, and what mechanisms regulate its distribution and use” (3). Significantly, it is an approach that developed in the same cultural moment as the internet was coming into everyday life and might itself be seen as an artifact of that moment.

Taught by Kyle Stine.

IMDb: Internet Movie Database

How IMDb came to be and Production IMDb, acronym for Internet Movie database, is an online database of information that tracks pretty much everything to do about films and television series. Originally a fan operated website, the database is now operated by IMDB.com INC which is owned as a subsidiary under Amazon. As a wholly

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Letterboxd: Movie Lover’s Right Hand

What  is Letterboxd? Letterboxd is, to quote its founder Mattthew Buchanan, “A global social network for grassroots film discussion and discovery”1. The app allows for users to rate and catalogue films and keep up with popular discussions in film critiquing. I, personally, got into letterboxd when I became a film and media studies major. I

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